Andrew Martinsen's Walleye Fishing Update


Exploiting the Thermocline
Where Walleyes Hang Out


The thermocline plays an important role in Walleye fishing.

These fish may be situated at different areas of the thermocline depending on the time of year, the time of day, the weather conditions, and the water temperature.

Understanding these factors can help you determine where to fish and what depths to start out at.




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In warmer weather when the surface temperature is about seventy or eighty degrees during the day, Walleye can usually be located at the bottom levels of the thermocline or right below it, because the water is cooler and darker here.

As the weather warms, the thermocline is located deeper in the water. During cooler temperatures and winter months, the thermocline occurs much shallower than other seasons.

The thermocline is the area in the water where the temperature quickly changes with depth changes.

These areas are prime locations for Walleye, because there are large temperature differences in the water in small areas.

In warmer weather and on sunny days, the thermocline may be as deep as twenty five to thirty feet, making it very important to fish deep enough to be successful if you are looking for Walleye.

These are the times when most of the fish will usually be located between halfway through the thermocline and right underneath it.

This is usual during the late spring, summer, and early fall when the temperature of the water surface is above seventy degrees.

During the cooler months, and on very windy and overcast days, the thermocline may be as shallow as ten or fifteen feet, especially in the winter months and if there is ice present over the water.

During these periods you may want to fish in shallower depths, and going down twenty to thirty feet may not be necessary to catch even trophy Walleye.

If the water temperature is between fifty and seventy degrees, twenty feet may be a good place to start.

If the water temperature is below fifty degrees, starting at a depth of ten to fifteen feet may be reasonable given the water temperature and season.

Knowing where the fish are in relation to the thermocline in specific weather and seasons can help you locate more fish faster, and that means more chances at a trophy Walleye.

Because of the importance that this factor plays in Walleye behavior and location, locating the thermocline can give your Walleye fishing trip a big boost.

Successful Walleye fishing means using all the tips and tricks you can to find and then hook these creatures, and the thermocline can help in this area.

The next time you go out for some Walleye action, see if you can locate the thermocline and then be amazed at how much this can improve your fishing action.




Sign up for FREE Walleye Fishing Tips

Sign up for a Complimentary Copy of My Report Called "Secret Sauce: The Bait Recipe for More and Bigger Walleyes"!

PLUS, you also get a complimentary subscription to my exclusive email publication, jam-packed with loads of "under-the-radar" walleye fishing tips that can help you to
catch walleyes fast!


* Privacy Guarantee: I solemnly pledge never to spam you or sell your email address to anyone, and of course you can unsubscribe at any time.




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