Andrew Martinsen's Walleye Fishing Update


The Shallow Strategy
Raking in Fish in Shallow Lakes and Rivers


Walleye fishing strategies are an important step to success, because without effective strategies you may end up going home empty handed and missing out on some great fish. Strategies you use should depend on the waters being fished and the specific conditions present.

Fishing a shallow lake requires a good strategy. Because the lake is shallow all the way across, there are fewer places for the fish to hang out, and this makes it easier to find them. The darker waters in these lakes provide cover for the Walleye, and this means that you may find the fish in water as shallow as a few feet.




Sign up for FREE Walleye Fishing Tips
Right Now You Can Download A Free Copy Of My Free Report Called "Secret Sauce: The Bait Recipe for More and Bigger Walleyes."

Plus you get a FREE subscription to my exclusive email publication, jam-packed with loads of "under-the-radar" walleye fishing tips that can help you to
catch walleyes fast!


See For Yourself What The Buzz Is All About... Directions: It's easy. Simply fill in your name and email address below and a link to confirm your complimentary subscription will be sent to your email box immediately. Go ahead right now...


* Privacy Guarantee: I solemnly pledge never to spam you or sell your email address to anyone, and of course you can unsubscribe at any time.




Locating water in shallow lakes means using a strategy that does not include speed, because of the ten horsepower limit. Trolling along the shoreline can help you locate shelves that jut out into the lake, and these are prime areas for both bait fish and Walleye. Look for shelves that are at the most ten feet deep. Use either a jig or a crankbait, and make sure to keep your boat within casting range and avoid drifting too far. Precision boat control is important in this situation. Shelves which have active Walleye populations will result in some action, and this will let you know you are in the right spot. If crankbaits are not getting results, try switching to a jig and minnow presentation. This may prove successful when earlier efforts and presentations have failed. A jig that weighs between one sixteenth and one eighth of an ounce is most effective.

Trolling a river that has a current around eight miles an hour and is between fifteen and twenty five foot deep requires a strategy created just for this situation. Set your speed according to the clarity of the water. If the water is dark, start out slow, around one mile per hour. If the water is clear you can start at a faster speed. Planer boards may not work in this situation, so you may need to set up a number of rods individually. If you put a small split shot four to five feet above the crankbait this will stop debris such as leaves. Look at what the natural food in the river is, and use crankbaits that resemble the natural food sources. Jigs with twister tails are also an effective lure in rivers with these conditions. Pay close attention to turns and bends in the river, as well as areas where the river bottom rises up and then drops back down. Walleye loves spots like these to lie in wait and ambush their prey. Look closely at areas where fast water or currents meet slower waters, because Walleye like these spots. Troll slowly along the edges of the river, and the results you get Walleye fishing will be much better.




Sign up for FREE Walleye Fishing Tips

Sign up for a Complimentary Copy of My Report Called "Secret Sauce: The Bait Recipe for More and Bigger Walleyes"!

PLUS, you also get a complimentary subscription to my exclusive email publication, jam-packed with loads of "under-the-radar" walleye fishing tips that can help you to
catch walleyes fast!


* Privacy Guarantee: I solemnly pledge never to spam you or sell your email address to anyone, and of course you can unsubscribe at any time.




Home | Privacy Policy | Site Map | Terms |
Related | Contact Us | About Us | G+ | Resources

Copyright © WalleyeFishingSecrets.com. All Rights Reserved.