Andrew Martinsen's Walleye Fishing Update


Choosing Lures for Walleye
What to Use in Rivers and Lakes


Looking for the right lures for lakes and rivers when it comes to walleye fishing? You've come to right place!

Walleye will always prefer brightly colored lures (such as white, chartreuse, silver, blue, orange, and red) with quick movement. Your best bet is to get lures and baits that are similar in size to the prey walleye eat-this means the lures and baits need to be narrow and between three and five inches long.

Adult walleye typically feed on shiners, shad, minnows, and rainbow smelt if that gives you a good reference point.




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But, wait! Don't go out and buy anything just yet! You need to take where you're fishing into consideration. Is your location of choice a lake or a river? Why can't you use the same lure or bait in both? Simple, my dear friends. Rivers move and lakes don't. What could work in a lake may not in a swift river.

Rivers:

A jigless trip to get some walleye in a river will never produce an astounding amount of fish. Your best bet is to take round head jigs between 1/16- to 3/8-ounces in weight. Other types of jigs you can take along on your fishing trip are bucktail, bladed, knuckle ball, or weedless jigs.

Both live bait and artificial bait can be used in the river. If using live bait, go for minnow or nightcrawlers. For artificial bait, brighter colors will be more attractive to walleye because visibility will be low due to current kicking up sediment.

Carry shallow-running baits for night fishing and deep-diving baits for day fishing.

Lakes:

In lakes, you'll need a jig 1/4-ounces or more in weight if you going to use one. Since walleye will be hiding in deeper areas of the lake, you need to use deep-diving baits such as crank baits, fatraps, or husky jerks. You can also use twister tail.

With either river or lake, you can us specialized lure and baits, but this isn't necessary for novice anglers.

Another good tip? Get a lure with a rattle to attract attention in a cloudy body of water; the sounds will attract more walleye in the end.




Sign up for FREE Walleye Fishing Tips

Sign up for a Complimentary Copy of My Report Called "Secret Sauce: The Bait Recipe for More and Bigger Walleyes"!

PLUS, you also get a complimentary subscription to my exclusive email publication, jam-packed with loads of "under-the-radar" walleye fishing tips that can help you to
catch walleyes fast!


* Privacy Guarantee: I solemnly pledge never to spam you or sell your email address to anyone, and of course you can unsubscribe at any time.




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